Art of Living Wisdom.

Ganesha Chathurthi has arrived, the festival to invoke the Divine Lord Ganesha and his blessings for  prosperity and happiness. Lord Ganesha is a fun-loving, dancing, frolicking divinity and has been symbolically and graphically illustrated and modelled in different forms, from riding on His vahana, vehicle, the mouse Mooshika, to the modern day figurines, showing Him speaking on the phone, typing on the computer etc. Interestingly, all these caricatures seem to suit Him well and only go to make Him dearer and more loveable.

Who is Ganesha?

His name Ganesha, has two components, Gana plus Esha.

Esha means “the lord of”.

Gana stands for count, numbers, multitude. Which is why, the subject mathematics in the Indian knowledge system is known as “Ganitham”. The name Ganesha denotes Him to be the lord of multitudes and numbers and the faculty that is needed to count, deal with multitudes, is knowledge, intellect. It is this intellect which can help man overcome obstacles as man’s obstacles primarily stem from his mind.

Ganesha is also called Vigneshwara, the one who removes obstacles. And to channelize our mind, our thoughts and energies in the right direction to ensure successful completion of any task, we pray to Vigneshwara before we embark on any important activity, before all beginnings.

With this intellect to discern good from bad, knowledge and strength to overcome obstacles and act wisely and purposefully, it is but natural man will live the knowledge of Art of Living and be endowed with prosperity. Hence Ganesha is also considered to usher in prosperity and good luck. And to embody the humility that should go with all these wealth and wisdom, He is also called Vinayaka or the humble, approachable one.

This concept of praying for mental strength, wisdom, prosperity and to ward off all obstacles before embarking on any important activity, transcends many cultural and geographic boundaries and is not confined to India alone.

Janus and Ganesha

In ancient Rome too, the pre-Christian era had a divinity known as “Janus. Janus was a divinity who was propitiated to, during all beginnings. Images of Janus were also installed on doorways as a guardian. This Janus had two faces, one to look at the past and one to look at the future.

The God Janus

Janus and Ganesha both seem to be associated with two faces.

Ganesha had a human face before He got an elephant face. There are many interesting similarities between Janus and Ganesha including the aspect that phonetically their names are also similar. Janus is also a divinity associated with numbers, which is why, the first month of the calendar is named January after Janus.

Ganesha, Ganesha Everywhere

It is not only in Rome, but in different other parts of the world, that we find the knowledge, appreciation and reverence to the concept denoted by Ganesha.

We have sculptures of Ganesha in Central America, Persia, Afganisthan, China, Japan, Thailand, Cambodia and in many other South-Eastern Asian islands.

Kangiten Ganesha, Japan

Depiction of Ganesha as Warrior in Persia

Indonesia is the largest Muslim country in the world and forms the major part of the south eastern archipelago. The currency, the Rupiah note of Indonesia too, has an image of Ganesha, depicting him as a divinity for numbers and knowledge.

From this example, we can see that the concept of Ganesha was prevalent far and wide from faraway Central America to Europe to Asia, more than 2500 years back itself.

This commonality and the prevalence of the concept of Ganesha across the world, brings to our attention that Ganesha is not just a Hindu divinity in the limited sense, but a divinity of knowledge and numbers, not just of India but of the multitudes across the world.

Ganesha with all His multitude of forms, symbols and stories, is a concept, Tattva, epitomising the winning formula for a good mind, intellect, knowledge, strength and prosperity, which is the direction we all need to progress in.

Sharing here a beautiful talk by Gurudev Sri Sri Ravi Shankar where he unlocks the symbolism of Ganesha Festival

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=25GgL2wtmpU]

D.K. Hari and D. K. Hema Hari are authors, research collators and founders of Bharath Gyan. They may be contacted through www.bharathgyan.com . Email: bharathgyan@gmail.com

Comments

comments

4 Responses to “All the way to Persia… Ganesha is Everywhere”

  1. mkailkhura

    Nice to discover on Ganesh Chaturthi that we are really a One World Family, culturally and spiritually.

    Reply
  2. preitythomas

    Very useful info on the different ‘roopa’ of Lord Ganesha in various parts of the world. Never could imagine the Lord Vighneshwara’ was being worshiped in so many countries.

    Reply

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